Displaying items by tag: poultry

Craving an interesting twist on turkey? Try this recipe for a spicy-sweet Moroccan-flavoured bird. For ease of cooking and presentation, I have the butcher flatten the turkey by removing its backbone and the breast bone. It cooks more quickly this way, freeing up the oven to reheat other vegetables. It also makes for easy carving, which is helpful when you’re rushing to get dinner on the table. Using Moroccan spices gives the turkey a complex flavour profile without heat. It is also an opportunity to vary the side dishes to match the turkey seasoning. For sides, I would serve couscous garnished with pomegranate seeds, roasted root vegetables and cardamom-flavoured Brussels sprouts. A beet and yogurt salad as a first course would complete the feast. My spice mixture is based on Moroccan ras el hanout, a blend of up to 30 spices that varies from household to household. Mine is simpler, with sweet spices at its core. You can buy ras el hanout in some supermarkets and spice shops, but it is also easy to make at home.

21.01.2015
Published in Recipes
You can use Asian glutinous or sticky rice or Japanese sushi rice for this recipe. You will only need half the rice mixture for the capon. Bake the rest separately in a gratin dish for 30 minutes, covered. Serve with baby bok choy and stir-fried asparagus. Use a large chicken if capon is unavailable. The capon is semi-boned for this recipe. The butcher will do this for you although it's easy to do yourself. The rice stuffing gives it back its shape. If you have extra stuffing bake separately for 30 minutes and serve on the side.
17.12.2014
Published in Recipes

This dish is not spicy, but it has layers of flavour. Chicken thighs or legs are best here; breasts tend to dry out.

10.12.2014
Published in Recipes

A powerful, full-flavoured but not spicy dish with the taste of the sun that we sorely need at this time of the year. Prepare the dish until it is ready for the oven and then bake when needed. Estonian food is based on the land and the sea. They grow wonderful vegetables in Estonia, the mushroom market was a sight to behold. It has many international influences but lately more from the Nordic countries. However to be truly Estonian, serve with black rye bread.

19.11.2014
Published in Recipes

One of my favourite ways to cook chicken is to braise it in the oven in a heavy pot. It comes out browned and moist and you can cook the garnishes along with it. At this time of year, apples are a perfect complement to chicken; to add some zest, I have also included hot Italian sausage and the current trendy vegetable: celery (both are superb with chicken, too). If spice isn’t to your liking, use mild sausage. And choose apples that will hold their shape and not turn to apple sauce; my preference leans toward the Gala or Pink Lady varieties, which are sweet and keep their texture. In the winter, I make this same same dish with prunes instead of apples and mushrooms instead of celery. The perfect accompaniment is sautéed Swiss chard and creamy mashed potatoes.

08.11.2014
Published in Recipes
An all-in-one main course with the chicken baking on top of the vegetables. If you want a green vegetable with it, use French green or runner beans.
29.10.2014
Published in Recipes
You can use chicken breasts or legs with this recipe if preferred but a whole chicken has the best texture. Use an ovenproof casserole that fits the chicken snugly, rather than a larger one. The texture of the chicken remains juicy and the taste is very flavourful. If you do not have a casserole that goes on top of the stove then use a skillet and transfer to your ovenproof dish.
22.10.2014
Published in Recipes
Have the butcher remove the backbone and breastbone of the turkey. Laying the turkey flat makes it cook much more quickly and evenly. It also carves much better. You will have to buy fresh herbs for the savoury butter, but you can use the leftover bunches to garnish the bird when serving. If you want stuffing, either bake it separately or place it in the baking pan and put the turkey on top. I find a large cookie sheet with sides works well for this method. You can do up to a 14-lb (6.5-kg) turkey, but larger birds don’t cook evenly. Instead, cook two smaller ones.
08.10.2014
Published in Recipes

The crisp crackle of Peking Duck skin is one of my favourite tastes and textures. My mother used to make Peking Duck at home. She would hang the duck from a hook, place a fan near it and leave it until the skin dried out (usually 24 hours). Then she would roast it at high heat. It was a superb recipe, but also time-consuming and, with a duck dangling in the kitchen, not altogether attractive. People who saw it were quite shocked. You’ll get a similar result in a short time by making these Peking chicken thighs. A frying pan large enough to hold the thighs is best because the sauce can be made directly in it. Otherwise, use a rack over a roasting pan and make the sauce in the pan. Gai lan is Chinese broccoli, but any green will do. Serve rice on the side. Any sweet wine with a high amount of sugar works to brown the skin. Ice wine would be expensive but sensational.

15.09.2014
Published in Recipes

Every kid (and anyone who’s a kid at heart) loves fried chicken, and these sandwiches will send your taste buds soaring. Marinating in buttermilk overnight is a bit like brining. It tenderizes the chicken and brings out the flavour. You could add bacon and lettuce for a BLC sandwich.

06.08.2014
Published in Recipes