Food for thought - Lucy's Blog

By Lucy Waverman The S. Pellegrino Cooking Cup is a competition only the fertile minds of passionate Italians could think of. Young chefs under 30 cook a signature dish one night and another dish in the galley of a yacht racing around Venice the following day. The judges are world-renowned chefs, including my new favourite Gastón Acurio. He is the force behind many Peruvian restaurants, including Astrid & Gastón, singled out by S. Pellegrino as the number one restaurant in Latin America and number 8 in the world. The competitors come from around the globe and Canada had a competitor…
08.07.2014
By Kristen Eppich I eat my fair share of yogurt, but I didn’t know much about how it was made. In April, I had a chance to visit the iögo manufacturing facility in Granby, Quebec. I also visited a nearby dairy farm that supplies some of their milk, so I got to see the whole yogurt-making process. Did you know the two dots over the “o” in “iögo” don’t really mean anything? They were just a fun branding choice. Here are some of the other things I learned about the yogurt industry: In 1971 the average Canadian consumed less than…
23.06.2014
Book Review by Gaeby Abrahams David Sax The Tastemakers: Why We’re Crazy for Cupcakes but Fed Up with Fondue. McLelland & Stewart, 2014. 336 pp. $29.95 Though its opening pages read like an ode to the cultural significance of Sex and the City, David Sax’s new book soon develops into an engaging examination of food trends. Broad in scope yet detailed in its analysis, The Tastemakers delves into what food trends are, how they happen, and why they matter. It’s a good time to take on this topic – foodyism is bolstered by everything from competitive cooking shows to farmers’…
11.06.2014
What flavour defines a dish? When Lucy Waverman sat down with fellow Globe and Mail columnist and wine and cocktail expert, Beppi Crosariol, to discuss how they might approach what would be her eighth cookbook, it was this simple question that led to the inspiration they were looking for. The result is "The Flavour Principle" -- an eclectic collection of recipes and drink pairings based on 11 different flavours, including smoky, sweet, nutty and spicy. They set out to distinguish the taste that makes each dish what it is, that serves as a jumping-off point for the layering of complementary…
10.10.2013
I recently had the opportunity to speak at the first ever Food Bloggers of Canada conference, a truly enlightening experience. Held from April 12-14, 2013 at Hockley Valley Resort, Ontario, the conference allowed the Canadian food blogging community to connect and learn from one another in a venue that was simply buzzing with excitement and new ideas. I spoke to the crowd about the ever-changing landscape of food blogging and a topic that many budding food bloggers probably wonder about: how to parlay a blogging career into a successful book deal. For your reading pleasure, I've included it below. How…
29.05.2013
For 30 years, The Cookbook Store has been a unique facet in Toronto’s food community, attracting both rare books and world-class authors to the city. Since opening its doors, The Cookbook Store has been host to authors like Gordon Ramsay, Thomas Keller and Ferran Adria. In fact, many cookbook authors don’t take a step without first consulting the store’s irreplaceable manager, Alison Fryer. But the most important thing that The Cookbook Store has provided is a forum for Toronto’s food lovers to express creative and different ideas. After 30 years, it’s still a great place to listen, discuss and foster…
20.03.2013
By: Kristen Eppich When it comes to olive oil, it truly is a matter of taste. Much like wine and scotch, the terroir of an olive tree is as much a part of the oil it produces as the grape or barley. Along with its unique flavour, olive oil is considered a very healthy alternative to other oils. High in monounsaturated fats (or the “good fat”), loaded with antioxidants and containing anti-inflammatory agents, it’s one of nature’s gifts for us to consume. From a cook’s perspective, it’s important to understand the flavour profiles of a product, and the ways it…
23.08.2012
  There are few things more satisfying than the aroma of a stew bubbling gently in the oven. The most soothing of foods, stews are also one of the easiest to prepare. Plus, they freeze well, reheat beautifully and are even better after a couple of days. Braising and stewing are interchangeable terms; both mean long, slow cooking in liquid, usually in the oven, to ensure even heat. The result is rich, saucy and tender. The quintessential peasant food – the rich got the best cuts and roasted them, the poor ended up with the tough ones – stews are…
18.01.2012
  How to set a buffet table is a written in stone kind of procedure. Here are a few rules that make it easier for your guests. The first step is to understand how people walk a table and make sure that what they need is on hand. Don't  jam a table in front of a wall. Have it int he middle of a room to allow guests to walk around it. Better traffic flow. Plates go at one end of the table where the food line up starts. Forks, knives and napkins go at the other end so that…
29.06.2011
With barbecue season on the horizon, here are my top tips to get the best from your grill this summer: - Season meat with salt and pepper before you grill. It improves the taste. You don't need marinades and rubs when you grill top-quality meat, unless you want to give it an international taste such as Indian or Asian. Lesser quality or tougher meats need something to help break down the fibres and it can be as simple as a salad dressing or an herbal mixture with a base of mustard or a citrus. - With a gas grill, generally grill…
18.05.2011